Posts tagged EEOC v. RG and GR Funeral Homes.

Here is a judge an employer can love.

The Sixth Circuit decision seems overall correct, although it contains some "woke dicta," too.

Are you in the know?

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed today two lawsuits contending that employers' alleged discrimination and harassment based on sexual orientation violates the Title VII ban on sex discrimination. One suit was filed on behalf of a gay call center employee in Pennsylvania, and the other was filed on behalf of a lesbian forklift operator in Maryland.

Here is the ...

Boy, the Detroit area seems to be in the front lines for the gender-identity wars.

As I've previously reported here, here, here, and here, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has a high-profile gender-stereotyping lawsuit going on against an area funeral home chain based on its discharge of a transgender employee. The funeral home is represented by the Alliance Defending ...

Well, this should be interesting.

As I've reported before, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has sued a funeral home chain in the Detroit area for terminating Aimee Stephens, a transgender woman, because she failed to conform to male sex stereotypes.

Caitlin Jenner.flickrCC.MikeMozart
This is not Aimee Stephens.

The defendants moved to dismiss the lawsuit, but their motion was denied in April.

After the court ...

How much do you really know about sexual relationships in the workplace? Take my quiz, and find out!

Bert gives Ernie all the cushy jobs because they're having a consensual affair. Can Ernie's co-workers sue for sex harassment or discrimination?

Giddyap! It's been a short week, but we have tons to talk about in the labor and employment law world!

Thinking out loud about the impact of yesterday's DOMA decision on the Family and Medical Leave Act. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit* held yesterday that Section 3 of the federal Defense of Marriage Act was unconstitutional. Section 3 provides that, for purposes of ...

Last week, my post was about retaliation, and how employers can be liable and how they can defend themselves. As luck would have it, two recent court decisions illustrate beyond my wildest imagination how important this issue can be.

Five years between protected activity and adverse action? No problem! I said last week that most courts find that a six-month or more time lapse between the ...

Robin Shea has 30 years' experience in employment litigation, including Title VII and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (including the Amendments Act). 
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