Posts in Alternative Dispute Resolution.

There are cons, as well as pros.

Here are some initial thoughts.

This will be a long slog.

(You've been warned.)

As I reported Tuesday, a federal judge has ruled that the wellness regulations issued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission are invalid. Judge John D. Bates of the District of Columbia did not vacate the rules but remanded them to the EEOC to address the rules' "failings." Now that I've had a chance to read the decision, I ...

You may have heard by now that not one, but two, federal courts have struck Hot Dog Man.flickrCC.JeleneMorrisdown President Trump's second attempt at a travel ban Executive Order. As always, Will Krasnow and Jeanette Phelan from our Immigration Practice Group have the story, including links to the two court decisions. Last we heard, President Trump is done with rewrites -- he plans to take the battle to the Supreme ...

Me and my nerdy mind.

Gretchen Carlson.flickrCC.Disney-ABCNews
"Uh-oh."

It's too soon for me to have an opinion about who's right and who's wrong in the Gretchen Carlson-Roger Ailes sexual harassment case. Some very disturbing allegations have been made about Mr. Ailes' (long before Fox) having a "casting couch" for prospective female talent. If that's true, then it's disgusting.

On the other hand, a number of current ...

If you want your arbitration agreement to be enforceable, don't give it to your employee to sign while she is drunk and practically naked. At least, not in California.

By David Phippen of our Metro D.C. Office.

While the year is still young, here are 15 New Year's resolutions that employers may want to make:

1. Make sure your "independent contractors" are really independent contractors. "Independent contractors" are under scrutiny by the Internal Revenue Service, the U.S. Department of Labor, the National Labor Relations Board, state and local agencies, plaintiffs' lawyers, and union organizers. A misclassification can cost you back taxes, back pay (including overtime), and back benefits, as well as penalties and interest. 

2. Review your email policies. The NLRB recently found that employees generally have a right to use employer email systems during non-working time in support of union organizing and concerted activity. The Board's decision means that many employer email use policies, as currently drafted, would probably be found to violate the National Labor Relations Act if an unfair labor practice charge were filed or a union tried to organize employees and argued that the employer's email policy interfered with the organizing efforts. In light of the new "quickie election" rule that the NLRB issued last month, both union and non-union employers would be well advised to review their email policies and revise as needed. (The "quickie election" rule is scheduled to take effect on April 14, but the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other employer groups, including the Society for Human Resources Management, filed suit on Monday seeking to block the rule.)

It's not too late to register for our webinar on the NLRB's new rules on "quickie elections" and employee email use. The webinar, featuring labor attorneys Tim Davis, Jonathan Martin, and Dan Murphy, is from noon to 1 p.m. Eastern tomorrow (January 8). Be there, or be square! 

Guest post by Tommy Eden, a partner in Constangy's Opelika, Alabama, and West Point, Georgia, offices.

In all the hoopla over the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision last week, it may have been lost that the Court refused to review a circuit court decision compelling arbitration in a collective action under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

All federal courts of appeal to decide the ...

Is IBM crazy, or just crazy like a fox?

Seriously. Do I look crazy to you?
Seriously. Do I look crazy to you?

Bloomberg BNA reported this week that IBM has stopped providing the "disclosures" required by the Older Workers Benefit Protection Act when it hands out severance packages.

As you know, when an employer has a "group termination" -- usually, a reduction in force, but a "group" can be as few as two people -- it is ...

The National Labor Relations Board has taken the position that many garden-variety employment policies violate the law. These rulings place employers in a “Catch 22”—if employers rescind the policies, they could have trouble defending themselves in unemployment cases, wrongful termination lawsuits, or before government agencies like the Equal Employment Opportunity ...

Robin Shea has more than 20 years' experience in employment litigation, including Title VII and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (including the Amendments Act). 
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